Papers

(2020). (Almost) Everything in Moderation: New Evidence on Americans' Online Media Diets. American Journal of Political Science.

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(2020). Exposure to untrustworthy websites in the 2016 US election. Nature Human Behaviour.

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(2020). Digital Literacy and Online Political Behavior.

Preprint

(2020). Do Online Voter Guides Empower Citizens? Evidence from a Field Experiment with Digital Trace Data. Public Opinion Quarterly.

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(2020). A digital media literacy intervention increases discernment between mainstream and false news in the United States and India. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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(2020). "Fake news" may have limited effects beyond increasing beliefs in false claims. The Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) Misinformation Review.

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(2019). Responsiveness without Representation: Evidence from Minimum Wage Laws in U.S. States. American Journal of Political Science.

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(2019). How Accurate Are Survey Responses on Social Media and Politics?. Political Communication.

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(2019). Less than you think: Prevalence and predictors of fake news dissemination on Facebook. Science Advances.

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(2019). How Many People Live in Political Bubbles on Social Media? Evidence From Linked Survey and Twitter Data. SAGE Open.

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(2019). Can the Government Deter Discrimination? Evidence from a Randomized Intervention in New York City. The Journal of Politics.

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(2018). Does Counter-Attitudinal Information Cause Backlash? Results from Three Large Survey Experiments. British Journal of Political Science.

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(2016). When Treatments are Tweets: A Network Mobilization Experiment over Twitter. Political Behavior.

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