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(Almost) Everything in Moderation: New Evidence on Americans' Online Media Diets

Does the internet facilitate selective exposure to politically congenial content? To answer this question, I introduce and validate large-N behavioral data on Americans' online media consumption in both 2015 and 2016. I then construct a simple …

Exposure to untrustworthy websites in the 2016 US election

Although commentators frequently warn about echo chambers, little is known about the volume or slant of political misinformation that people consume online, the effects of social media and fact checking on exposure, or the effects of political …

"Fake news" may have limited effects beyond increasing beliefs in false claims

Since 2016, there has been an explosion of interest in misinformation and its role in elections. Research by news outlets, government agencies, and academics alike has shown that millions of Americans have been exposed to dubious political news …

A digital media literacy intervention increases discernment between mainstream and false news in the United States and India

Few people are prepared to effectively navigate the online information environment. This global deficit in digital media literacy has been identified as a critical factor explaining widespread belief in online misinformation, leading to changes in …

Do Online Voter Guides Empower Citizens? Evidence from a Field Experiment with Digital Trace Data

Voting Advice Applications (VAAs), which provide citizens with information on the party that best represents their political preferences, are often cited as evidence of the empowering capabilities of digital tools. Aside from the informational …

How Accurate Are Survey Responses on Social Media and Politics?

How accurate are survey-based measures of social media use, in particular about political topics? We answer this question by linking original survey data collected during the U.S. 2016 election campaign with respondents? observed social media …

Responsiveness without Representation: Evidence from Minimum Wage Laws in U.S. States

Abstract How well does public policy represent mass preferences in U.S. states? Current approaches provide an incomplete account of statehouse democracy because they fail to compare preferences and policies on meaningful scales. Here, we overcome …

Can the Government Deter Discrimination? Evidence from a Randomized Intervention in New York City

Racial discrimination persists despite established antidiscrimination laws. A common government strategy to deter discrimination is to publicize the law and communicate potential penalties for violations. We study this strategy by coupling an audit …

How Many People Live in Political Bubbles on Social Media? Evidence From Linked Survey and Twitter Data

A major point of debate in the study of the Internet and politics is the extent to which social media platforms encourage citizens to inhabit online ?bubbles? or ?echo chambers,? exposed primarily to ideologically congenial political information. To …

Less than you think: Prevalence and predictors of fake news dissemination on Facebook

So-called “fake news” has renewed concerns about the prevalence and effects of misinformation in political campaigns. Given the potential for widespread dissemination of this material, we examine the individual-level characteristics associated with …